Facebook

Geology of Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
or copy the link
English: Area of the Arctic National Wildlife ...

English: Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain, looking south toward the Brooks Range mountains. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve is one of the last true wildernesses in the world today. Stretching almost 200 miles from east to west, and covering an estimated 8.1 million hectares, it is located in north central Alaska in the central Brooks Range. All of this vast wilderness lies north of the Arctic Circle some 200 miles to the north of Fairbanks. The Alaskan landscape is dominated by the ragged peaks of the Brooks Range dissected by impressive valleys, often containing sparkling clearwater rivers and pristine alpine lakes. There are a few alpine glaciers remaining, although the majority of the park & preserve is vegetated with tundra and shrubs.

The name for the “Gates” of the Arctic National Park & Preserve can be traced back to Robert Marshall, a frequent traveller to the area during the 1930’s who described two of the peaks, Boreal Mountain and Frigid Crags as the “gates” from the Brooks Range to the arctic regions further north. Much of this wild and rugged landscape has been sculptured by natural forces – the constant freeze, thawing and refreezing of water, temperature, tectonic action plus glacial movement have all had a hand in the northern and eastern portion of these Rocky Mountains. The southern foothills rise to around 4,000 feet or more, with the more northerly granite and limestone peaks rising a massive 7,000 feet.

Many waterways dissect the Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, the six national wild rivers being;

  • John
  • Kabuk
  • the Alatna
  • the Tinayguk
  • Noatak
  • North Fork Koyukuk.

This is one of the most remote and untouched places on earth. Visitors to the Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve won’t find any trails or visitor services within the park itself, they must be completely self sufficient.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Powered by Yahoo! Answers