Facebook

Haleakala National Park Fees & Reservations

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
or copy the link
Haleakalā-04

Haleakalā-04 (Photo credit: pclarkson)

You must purchase a recreational pass when you first enter Haleakala National Park. These entrance passes are not transferable. The prices are as follows;

Daily Passes to Haleakala National Park

At the risk of being very confusing and before we go any further I must point out that daily passes to Haleakala National Park are valid for 3 days including the day that they were purchased – I know, it’s not my fault, I don’t make up the rules you know. Oh, and they’re non-transferable.

  • Private vehicles must pay $10 to enter the park, which is valid for a total of 3 days. This includes all passengers in the car for both the Summit and the Kipahulu areas of Haleakala National Park.
  • Motorcycles must pay $5 to enter the park, again for a total of 3 days. This admits one person per vehicle to both the Summit and the Kipahulu areas of the park, any passengers must pay the individual person fee.
  • Individuals entering Haleakala National Park must pay an entrance fee of $5 each, again, for 3 days admission to the park. This is charged to people who enter the park on foot, hikers, bicyclists etc. Youths below 15 years of age may enter the park free of charge.
Fees for Commercial Organized Groups Entering Haleakala National Park
  • $5 per person is the entrance fee for any organized groups which are non road-based entering the park. This covers activities like hiking and astronomy.
  • Vehicles which carry between 1 and 7 people must pay $30 to enter the park, plus $5 per passenger.
  • Large vans and mini buses which carry between 8 and 25 people must pay $45 to enter the park.
  • Coach buses which carry 26 passengers or more may enter the park for a fee of $100.

Now that’s dedication for you. Fortunately there are just a few people like this who are willing to make the sacrifice (get up at 3am) and ultimately claim the prize of seeing some of the most spectacular sights on earth, and then take a video of it for the people who don’t believe that 3am exists, not in the mornings anyway.

Camping at Haleakala National Park

There are two campgrounds at Haleakala National Park which are accessible by car, great for those who enjoy a “get away from it all” trip without having to hike for miles carrying their tent in their backpack. The campgrounds are Kipahulu and Hosmer Grove.

Kipahulu Campground, Haleakala National Park – is on the eastern side of the island, accessed by the Hana Highway. Close to sea level this campground overlooks ocean cliffs can accommodate up to 100 people, with a 12 person limit on the size of each group of campers. Spaces are strictly on a first come, first served basis, you can’t make reservations to camp here. Campers may stay for a maximum of 3 nights per month. This campground is around 1/8 mile to the south of the Kipahulu Visitor Center, close to the Hana Highway. Facilities include;

  • Picnic tables
  • Pit toilets
  • BBQ grills
  • Note – there is no water available at the campground, but drinking water is available in the restrooms of the Kipahulu Visitor Center a short distance away.
  • Prepared for lashings of rain, burning sun and plenty of mosquitoes.

Wow, check out those colors . . . beautiful.

Hosmer Grove Campground, Haleakala National Park – is just below 7,000 feet in the cloud belt of the summit area. This campground can accommodate a maximum of 50 people, with no more than 12 persons permitted in anyone group. Sites are strictly on a first come, first served basis, no reservations are accepted. Campers are permitted to stay for a maximum of 3 nights in any one month. As far as the weather is concerned, be prepared for rain, and be prepared for it to get very cold. During the night time the temperatures drop close to freezing, reaching highs of around 50 – 65 dec C during the daytime. This campground makes a terrific base for an early morning hike to enjoy the many native birds at dawn. Facilities to expect at this campground include;

  • Picnic tables
  • BBQ grills
  • Pit toilets
  • Drinking water

Great stuff, although I’m not sure who was the wobbliest, little Roxanne or the person shooting the video!

Wilderness Cabins at Haleakala National Park

Another alternative perfect for those who want to stay for a night in the park, do like hiking but don’t want to carry their tents with them is to reserve a place in one of the three wilderness cabins which are maintained for visitor use. Yes, I said reserve a place for these cabins, they’ve got to be reserved in advance. These cabins are only accessible by hiking a trail,

  • It’s a 3.7 mile hike to the cabin at Holua
  • It’s a 5.5 mile trail to the cabin at Kopalaoa
  • You need to be up to a 9.3 mile hike to the cabin at Paliku
You do need permit to reserve a place in any of these cabins, the permit holder has got to be with the group at all times and you must all follow these rules.
  • Each individual is permitted to stay for a maximum of 3 nights in any 30 day period at any of the wilderness cabins or campsites, with a maximum of 2 nights in any one place.
  • The maximum group size allowed is 12 people.
  • The permit holder must be more than 18 years of age, have photo ID and be present with the group all of the time.
  • Before you are permitted to stay in a Wilderness cabin you must watch an orientation at Park Headquarters Visitor Center.
  • The cabins have pit toilets and non potable water. Don’t drink the water without filtering it or treating it.
  • Facilities in each cabin include a 2 burner propane stove, cooking utensils, dishes, a wood-burning stove plus some firewood, 12 padded bunks. During drought times you’ll have to bring your water with you.
  • You will have to remember to bring lots of warm clothes and sleeping bags.
  • The cabins do not have electricity.
  • Quiet hours are between 8pm and 8am
  • Cabins are charged at $75 per night for reservations more than three weeks in advance.
  • Cabins are charged at $60 per night for reservations less than three weeks in advance.

Wilderness Camping at Haleakala National Park

Haleakala National Park has two primitive wilderness campsites, one at Paliku and one at Holua – both of these sites are accessible only by trail. You do need a permit to be permitted to camp at either of these sites, the permits are free but you do need to bring some photo ID and watch an 8-minute orientation at the Park Headquarters Visitor Center before you are let loose in the great outdoors.

Holua Campsite is accessible via the shortest hike, at 6,940 feet. It’s around 3.7 miles along the Halemau’u Trail, or alternatively 7.4 miles from the Sliding Sand Trailhead.

  • Campsites are available on a first come, first served basis.
  • Spaces may be reserved for educational and civic groups.
  • A 3 night maximum stay is permitted for each person, with a 2 night maximum at each site.
  • There’s room for a maximum of 25 people, no more than 12 persons per group.
  • Pit toilets are close by.
  • Water is available although it is non potable and must be treated before it is safe to drink.
  • Water may be carried in during drought times.

Paliku Campsites is at 6,380 feet, towards the eastern end of the valley. There is a 9.3 mile strenuous trail on the Sliding Sands Trail to the campsite, or alternatively a 10.4 mile hike along the Halemau’u Trail. Rain is common here, plus clouds and fog, although it just goes to making the area that little bit extra lush and cool.
  • Campsites are available on a first come, first served basis.
  • Spaces may be reserved for educational and civiv groups.
  • A 3 night maximum stay is permitted for each person, with a 2 night maximum at each site.
  • There’s room for a maximum of 25 people, no more than 12 persons per group.
  • Pit toilets are close by.
  • Water is available although it is non potable and must be treated before it is safe to drink.
  • Water may be carried in during drought times.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Powered by Yahoo! Answers