Olympic National Park Fees & Reservations

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park (Photo credit: gabri_micha)

More current news and information on the Olympic National Park Facebook page.

Olympic National Park is a great place to visit, and a visit to one of the most spectacular places on Earth certainly won’t cost the Earth, but it will cost you something. How much? Read on . . .

Olympic National Park Entrance Fees

  • A single visit to Olympic National Park in a motor vehicle will cost $15 per vehicle which covers you for up to seven consecutive days.
  • Individuals entering the Olympic National Park on foot, bicycle or motorcycle will have to pay $5 each, unless you’re 15 years and under in which case it’s free.
  • School groups are sometimes allowed free entrance to the Olympic National Park if the class curriculum relates to the park resources – surely you can think of something and start nagging your Geology teacher . . . go on, it could be free and you’re sure of a much better time at Olympic National Park than you have in the classroom.
  • If you want to keep on returning to Olympic National Park then it’s a good idea to buy an annual pass, they only cost $30 and can be used at any of the entrance stations to the park for a whole year (which is why it’s called an annual pass).

Campground Reservations & Fees

Olympic National Park Campgrounds do not accept reservations, they’re all on a first come, first served basis, except Kalaloch which is open all year, but reservations are accepted (and advisable) between June and September. There are lots of different campgrounds in Olympic National Park, some do offer more facilities than others, so let’s take a quick look at them all and see how much a nights camping will cost ya’ and what you can expect for your money.

Hang on a minute . . . I think I’m seeing double and I haven’t even touched a drop of wine yet! Double trouble having fun on their camping trip to the Olympic National Park.

  • Altair Campground, Olympic National Park – there are 30 sites available at Altair, for $12 per night, but it’s only open between late in May until towards the end of October. Running water is available.
  • Deer Park Campground, Olympic National Park – is suitable for tents only, and it’ll only cost you $10 per night, there are 14 sites, however, there is no water and only pit toilets. It’s open from the middle of June until mid way through fall.
  • Dosewallips Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year, but sometimes (at the moment actually – depending on when you read this) the road is closed so this particular campground is only accessible on foot. There’s no water and only pit toilets, so don’t forget that you’ll have to carry some water with you. Oh, camping here is free!
  • Elwha Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year round, but running water is only available in the summertime, and there are only pit toilets during the winter. It’ll cost you $12 per night to camp at Elwha Campground, and there are 40 sites available.
  • Fairholme Campground, Olympic National Park – is open from April through to mid fall, and has 88 sites available at a cost of $12 each per night. Running water is available.
  • Graves Creek Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year round, and although it does have running water in the summertime, it doesn’t in the winter. Once again, toilet facilities are pit toilets during the winter, and it’ll cost you $12 per night for one of the 30 pitches.
  • Heart O’ The Hills Campground, Olympic National Park – is open for the entire year but is often only accessible on foot during the winter due to the snow. It’ll cost you $12 per night for any of the 105 sites, and running water is available.
  • Hoh Campground, Olympic National Park – is open for the full year, (with running water available all year) and has a total of 88 sites at a cost of $12 per night.

Yeah, not the greatest video master of all times, but you get the general idea of the beauty of the place.

 

  • Kalaloch Campground, Olympic National Park – remember, this is the only campground in Olympic National Park which accepts reservations in the summer, from the end of June until the beginning of September, but it is actually open all year round. Prices will cost between $14 and $18 per night for one of the 170 sites.
  • Mora Campground, Olympic National Park – is again open all year round and does have running water the whole time. One of the 94 sites will cost you $12 per night.
  • North Fork Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year round but it is rather primitive with no water and only pit toilets. That’s why one of the 9 sites will only cost you $10 per night.
  • Ozette Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year, except that it might close in the winter. The 15 pitches will cost $12 per night, each, and although there is running water in the summertime, there ain’t in the winter when you’ll have to make do with pit toilets.
  • Queets Campground, Olympic National Park – is open year round, but is another primitive camping experience. The 20 sites are charged at $10 each, but there is no water and pit toilets.
  • Sol Duc Campground, Olympic National Park – is open all year and you’ll have to pay $14 for one of the 82 pitches . . . HOWEVER . . . sometimes it’s closed! There is running water available in the summer, but during the winter there’s no water and pit toilets.

 

  • South Beach Campground, Olympic National Park – is open from Memorial Day weekend through to the middle of September. It does have running water but there is no wheelchair access to the flushing toilets. You’ll have to pay $10 for one of the 50 sites.
  • Staircase Campground, Olympic National Park – this campground is open all year round, except when it’s not open because of snow, which does happen quite often. There are 47 pitches at a price of $12 per night, and although there is running water in the summertime, there’s no water and only pit toilets during the winter.

NB – Dump stations are available at Fairholme, Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora and Sol Duc for a charge of $5 per dump.

Prices are all correct at the moment, but in case you don’t stumble across this web page for another couple of years and there have been some increases, don’t blame me!

Overnight Wilderness Fees in Olympic National Park

For some people the whole point of camping in Olympic National Park is not to pitch up on a campground with 30, 40 or 50 other campers, but to hike out into the wilderness and set up their own camp. Overnight trips into the Olympic National Park back country require a permit, they cost $5 for each group, but it’s an extra $2 per person, per night.

OMG, Olympic National Park back country – there’s no other place on earth quite like it.

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